Enterprise Information & Technology

The Enterprise Information & Technology Standards are the result of years of international academic research and industry expert consensus on repeatable patterns that can be reused and replicated. The Enterprise Information & Technology Standards are packaged as ‘Reference Content’, and is both agnostic and vendor neutral. They have been specifically designed to be fully tailored to and implemented by any organization, both large and small, regardless of its various frameworks, methods, approaches, products, services and activities.

The Enterprise Information & Technology Standards are developed in the following ways:

  • Research and analyze what works – again and again (Best Practices) – and discover the unique aspects applied by leading organizations (Leading Practices).
  • Identify common and repeatable patterns which provide the basis for the Enterprise Standards.
  • Develop ‘Reference Content’ that increase the level of reusability and replication within the disciplines of Enterprise Modelling, Enterprise Engineering and Enterprise Architecture.
  • Extend with performance and value accelerators with unique aspects from the identified Best Practices and Leading Practices.

The Enterprise Information & Technology Standards consist of 31 different ‘Reference Content’ areas that are fully integrated with other frameworks, methods and approaches, such as TOGAF, META, FEAF, etc. This ensures full integration and standardization when applying the reference content into your organization, programs and/or projects, thereby having the ability to use our reference content across topics like strategy, capabilities, roles, and process, service and value aspects and technology as well as operational execution between them, creating a cross link throughout the Business, Information, and Technology layers.

Enterprise Information & Technology Reference Content

Description:

The importance of IT strategy, and IT strategy construct is not a new phenomenon, but as IT strategy work, and developing the Business Model of IT becomes less tangible, concerns with understanding, describing, and managing IT strategies develops into an increasingly complex, challenging, and important subject. As the frequency of the IT operating model increases, IT strategy becomes a centrepiece of adapting to technology trends, and emerging business requirements.

However, current IT strategy concepts are dispersed, and lack integration to the development of both the business of IT as well as the IT technology adaption to enable organisational innovation, and transformation. There is a need to enable meaningful and well-described IT strategies that establish a well-defined direction to the organisation. The IT Strategy standard includes various components from IT strategy artefacts, IT strategy meta model, IT strategy framework (lifecycle view) as well as a lot of different IT strategy execution reference content.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50001PG

Description:

As the global marketplace becomes increasingly competitive, CEOs today are placing a high degree of importance on business, and technology integration. Nearly 80 percent of the CEOs interviewed in The University Alliance’s Global CEO Study rated business innovation enabled by digital transformation as of “great importance.” However, there is a significant gap between their desired levels of digitalization, and the extent of the transformation they’ve actually achieved. Many feel that the current level of alignment between business, and IT is inadequate in their enterprise, and they find this to be a real source of frustration.

For the organizations that can achieve their goal, we see a successful pattern of the executive team working with their CIOs, to become collaborative partners. Which means those CIOs need to think in business terms. This unfolding new perspective means that CIOs must also analyze their IT business in much the same way a CEO or CFO might analyze the business of the overall organization. Building on a technique developed to help executive teams model their businesses in terms of key competencies, we created the Business Model for the Business Model of IT (BMofIT) framework. BM of IT is designed to help CIOs, and their teams take a business-oriented approach to IT.

The purpose of a BM of IT optimization is to achieve the “best” design relative to a set of prioritized criteria or constraints. These include maximizing factors such as productivity, strength, reliability, longevity, efficiency, and utilization. The IT capability modelling approach helps executives identify priorities for innovation, and investment by breaking their IT organizations down into strategic, tactical and operational areas, and the competencies within these areas. These competencies can be assessed for strategic competitiveness, and differentiation as well as tactical governance, monitoring, and control and at last but not least the operational execution of effectiveness, and efficiency, and mapped against spending, and staffing data, to identify the right strategic, tactical and operational priorities. The technique draws on It strategy aspects, and relates them to business modelling, business architecture, business process management, and value management principles, and techniques to identify, create, and realize the performance, and value an IT organization could deliver to its organization.

We offer the following BM of IT services:

  • Create a strategic IT view
    • analysis of the current Business Model of IT situation, and come up with detailed improvement suggestions.
    • Apply IT Design Thinking to your IT organisation.
    • Reshape the Business Model of IT.
    • IT cost cutting.
    • Identify what would be a suitable IT business model for you?
    • Identify where high complexity exists within the Business Model of IT, and specify a need for simplification, and reduction of complexity.
    • Develop a Business Model of IT view (A3).
  • Analyze and evaluate your Business Model of IT Maturity.
  • Assess your existing Business Model of IT Strategy and help enhance it.
  • Develop directional Business Model of IT aspects (vision, strategy, objectives, etc.).
  • Identify Business Model of IT requirements and assess your development potential.
  • Design a new – or improve upon an existing – Business Model of IT Roadmap.
  • Assess and develop your Business Model of IT Portfolio concept.
  • Analyze your Business Model of IT user (role) concept.
  • Rethink and transform your IT workflows (manual and automated).
  • Recognize and agree on where and how to go about IT standardization.
  • Determine how you can break free from your Business Model of IT siloes.
  • Spot and detail how to decomplexify your Business Model of IT solutions.
  • Identify optimization potential within the Business Model of IT concepts.
  • Assign and work with your Business Model of IT owners.
  • Develop a continuous Business Model of IT improvement technique.
  • Work with IT change, and make it stick!

Other services which might be interesting in combination with the above:

  • We have data across 10 sectors, and 52 different industries, categorised according to which practices are worst, best, and outperforming practices. Therefore, we can benchmark you against these practices, and come with detailed improvement suggestions of where, and how you could learn from others, enabling you with best, industry, and outperforming practices.
  • Knowledge worker analysis; identification of your best IT knowledge workers (depending on industry, about 5-15% are core differentiating, and core competitive knowledge workers). The rest are non-core knowledge workers, and therefore differentiating the Business Model of IT concepts adds no value.
  • How to go about Business Model of IT cost reduction.
  • How to go about Business Model of IT Innovation & Transformation (incl. advanced categorisation, and classification). This could be used to develop clean, and simple:
  • Develop a Business Model of IT Business Case.
  • Business Model of IT Change Management services.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50002BC

Description:

An IT process map shows the interactions that take place between customers, department representatives, analysts, and others. It outlines the specific steps to reach a particular outcome. IT Process Maps’ focus on the provision of leading practice know-how for service providers. It offers a process model for ITIL® and ISO 20000 (the “ITIL® Process Map”) that helps IT service providers to understand the principles behind ITIL and design their ITIL-aligned processes and documents. LEADing Practice’s Enterprise Information & Technology Standards align all the best and next practices as well as the standards for IT process maps.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50003BP

Description:

An IT Center of Competency (CoC) is a form of an IT Shared Service concept. It is an organizational structure used to coordinate IT skills with an enterprise. Competency centers provide expertise for project or program support, acting both as repositories of knowledge, and resource pools for multiple business areas. Skills-based competency centers, the most common type in an information services organization, are used for application development, software language skills, data management, Internet development, and network design.

Within the enterprise, it is increasingly common to find competency centers (or shared services) for travel, finance, and human resources. An IT CoC is for the most an independent body that is not owned by a particular organisational group, the corporate architecture board, or the IT operations team. Instead, an IT CoC is supported, and staffed by all organizations that have a stake in the success of a new technology. It is a managed entity with real priorities, and deliverables, not a “think tank” that comes up with new ideas—although a certain amount of R&D might need to be done to make a new technology successful in an organization.

The IT CoC develops common solutions, and acquires new skills that are then spread throughout the enterprise. This approach increases the likelihood of success of technology adoption. The key point is that an IT CoC is not about supporting a single development project; it is about the successful deployment of a new technology at the enterprise level.

An IT CoC has four main goals:

  1. Promote best practices, and standard processes that enable repeatable success.
  2. Provide as-needed expertise to solve specific problems that are related to development and deployment.
  3. Help teams become self-sufficient in knowledge and expertise.
  4. Create a focal point in the enterprise for looking ahead to new disruptive technologies and issues beyond the immediate focus of current projects.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50004BC

Description:

Cloud computing is the on-demand access to computer system resources, especially data storage (cloud storage), and computing power, without direct active management by the user. The term is generally used to describe data centers available to many users over the Internet. Few trends are more relevant, than cloud computing.

We see the rate of this change accelerate as more businesses get to grips with adopting various cloud models, and delivery of data from the cloud to our devices becomes more integral to our daily lives. Since cloud computing relies on sharing of resources to achieve coherence, and economies of scale. Our Cloud standards are the result of international academic research, and industry expert consensus on repeatable patterns that can be reused, and replicated. They have been designed to be tailored to any organization.

We can support you with various services within your business innovation, and digital transformation to achieve an optimal Cloud concept. Our services include among others:

  • Where and how you could learn from others (we have cloud best, industry, and outperforming practices).
  • Analysis of the current Cloud situation and come up with detailed improvement suggestions.
  • Analyze and evaluate your Cloud Maturity.
  • Assess your existing Cloud Strategy and help enhance it.
  • Develop directional Cloud aspects (vision, strategy, objectives, etc.).
  • Identify Cloud requirements and assess your development potential.
  • Design a new – or improve upon an existing – Cloud Roadmap.
  • Analyze your Cloud user (role) concept.
  • Rethink and transform your Cloud workflows (manual and automated).
  • Recognize and agree on where and how to standardize.
  • Spot and detail how to decomplexify your Cloud solutions.
  • Identify optimization potential within the Cloud concepts.
  • Assign and work with your Cloud owners.
  • Develop a continuous Cloud improvement technique.
  • Develop a Cloud Architecture; something that can help structure and align various Cloud concepts and the Cloud landscape.
  • We can help the transformation from “siloed IT-centric Cloud services” to “user-centric Cloud products”.
  • Work with change, and make it stick!

There are many benefits to moving your business to the Cloud, and though the usage of Cloud standards, and the related reference content, you can build upon the lessons learned by others. reducing time, cost, and increase the quality. It thereby effects the efficiency and effectiveness. We invite you to engage with our Cloud experts to discuss your needs and wants, and how our identified cloud practices could help you.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50005CC

Description:

Cybersecurity is the composite standard concerning the security, and protection of an organization’s data, information technology, networks, and devices from unauthorized access whether from an insider, competitor, hacker, attacker, intruder or criminal. Cybersecurity ensures integrity, confidentiality, and availability of data, and information within an organization. Cybersecurity reduces risks, and vulnerabilities in software, firmware, or hardware that can be exploited by others, and detracting from the organizational trust, confidence, and value to its stakeholders. The Cybersecurity standard has linkages, and dependencies to application, data, platform, infrastructure, and physical security standards.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50006CS

Description:

Knowledge Management (KM) is the process of creating, sharing, using, and managing the knowledge, and information of an organization. It refers to a multidisciplinary approach to achieve organisational objectives by making the best use of knowledge. Knowledge management is important because it boosts the efficiency of an organization’s decision-making ability. In making sure that all employees have access to the overall expertise held within the organization, a smarter workforce is built who are more able to make quick, informed decisions that benefit the company.

We have a lot of different KM services, among them are:

  • Where and how you could learn from others (we have KM best, industry, and outperforming practices).
  • Identify your knowledge workers.
  • Spot your core disruptive, core competitive and non-core capabilities (i.e. knowledge).
  • Relate your KM and workplace concepts better together (according to Gartner a 30% completive advantage potential).
  • Knowledge worker analysis: identification of your knowledge workers (depending on industry, about 5-15% are core differentiating, and core competitive knowledge workers). The rest are non-core knowledge workers, and therefore differentiating in the KM concepts adds no value.
  • Analyze and evaluate your KM Maturity.
  • Benchmark yourself against the leaders in the market (outperforming practices).
  • Assess your existing KM Strategy and help enhance it.
  • Identify KM requirements and assess your development potential.
  • Design a new – or improve upon an existing – KM Roadmap.
  • Analyze your KM user/role (knowledge worker) concept.
  • How to go about KM orchestration (advanced categorization and classification).
  • Rethink and transform your KM workflows (manual and automated).
  • Recognize and agree on where and how to standardize.
  • Spot and detail how to decomplexify your KM solutions.
  • Identify optimization potential within the KM concepts.
  • Assign and work with your KM owners.
  • Develop a continuous KM improvement technique.
  • Develop a KM Architecture; something that can help structure and align various KM concepts and the KM landscape.
  • We can help the transformation from “siloed IT-centric KM services” to “user-centric KM products”.
  • How to go about KM cost reduction.
  • Develop a KM Business Case.
  • Work with change, and make it stick!

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50007PGIDBC

Description:

Artificial Intelligence has the potential to transform how organizations operate, innovate, and deliver their services. While, adopting new technologies (software or hardware) has always been central to the improvement of any organization (including federal agencies). The challenges of such processes, and services, however, tend to vary among organizations.

The challenge for many organizations is determining where to start, and how to identify use cases where AI can make an immediate impact. These challenges are exacerbated by a widely acknowledged AI skills gap in the workforce today. An outperformer study by LEADing Practice revealed that 56% of AI professionals believe a lack of talent, and qualified workers is the greatest single barrier to AI implementation.

Organizations are challenged to address the needs of the many while providing support to the individual in need. Many tasks that do not require a human touch can be automated using AI, leaving more time for employees to provide real support to those people, and issues that require time, and attention. Given these challenges, implementation of AI will be a journey for most organizations, but the key is to put the right IT foundation in place.

We have a lot of different AI services that helps you in your journey:

  • AI Opportunity Assessment.
  • Where and how you could learn from others (we have AI use cases as well as AI best, industry and outperforming practices).
  • Develop an AI Business Case.
  • Non-Core analysis: identification of the non-core competencies and capabilities, and therefore where there is potential for AI automation and interaction.
  • Analyze and evaluate your AI Maturity.
  • Benchmark yourself against the leaders in the market (outperforming practices).
  • Assess your existing AI Strategy and help enhance it/develop it.
  • Identify AI requirements and assess your development potential.
  • Analyze your AI concept/portfolio.
  • Design a new – or improve upon an existing – AI Roadmap.
  • How to go about AI orchestration (advanced categorization and classification).
  • Rethink and transform your workflows (manual and automated) to enable it by AI.
  • Identify optimization potential with the AI concepts.
  • Develop an AI Architecture; something that can help structure and align various IT concepts and landscape.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50008PGIDBC

Description:

Robotic process automation (or RPA) applies artificial intelligence to business process automation. Unlike traditional software development, RPA systems capture the user’s tasks at run-time through the application’s graphical user interface (GUI). It then performs the automation by repeating those tasks directly in the GUI. This automation lowers the barrier to the use of automation as well as identifying tasks or how the user performs those tasks that software developers may not have envisaged at design-time.

Because RPA needs to consider all aspects of a task, RPA allows data handling in and between multiple applications, for instance, receiving an email containing an invoice, extracting the data, and then typing that content into a bookkeeping system. The RPA Standardization – Best Practice Flows in LEADing Practice’s Enterprise Information & Technology Standards align all the best and next practices as well as the standards for RPA.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50009PGIDBC

Description:

Analysis focuses on understanding the past, i.e. what happened and why it happened. Analytics focuses on why it happened and what will happen in the future. Analytics discovers, interprets, and communicates meaningful patterns in data. It applies data patterns to support effective decision making. Its value lies in areas rich with information, including the simultaneous application of statistics, computer programming and operations research to quantify performance.

Organisations apply analytics to business data to describe, predict, and improve business performance. These areas include predictive analytics, prescriptive analytics, enterprise decision management, descriptive analytics, cognitive analytics, Big Data Analytics, retail analytics, supply chain analytics, store assortment and stock-keeping unit optimisation, marketing optimisation and marketing mix modelling, web analytics, call analytics, speech analytics, sales force sizing and optimisation, price and promotion modelling, predictive science, graph analytics, credit risk analysis, and fraud analytics.

Analytics harnesses the most current algorithms, software and methods in computer science, statistics, and mathematics. LEADing Practice’s Enterprise Information & Technology Standards align all the best and next practices as well as the standards for Analytics.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50010PGIDBC

Description:

Enterprise reporting involves creating reports that online end users can access in a heterogeneous networked environment. Enterprise reporting focuses on solving the business reporting needs of end users regardless of either the source of the report data or the location of the report consumer. Traditional reporting, by contrast, provided users with reports generated from a single application or a desktop reporting package.

Paper-based reports, though sometimes convenient, are static and non-interactive, including their graphics. Reports must be able to consolidate data from multiple sources to deliver consistent, integrated enterprise-wide information on a routine, scheduled basis, on-demand, or in response to an external trigger. The reporting system contains report objects, report definition logic and report-metadata, and be able to deliver large numbers (tens of thousands) of complex, multipart reports to many concurrent, interactive users according to their security profile.

Reports can accept run-time parameters, such as date range, product number or sales territory, from users. Users should also be able to subscribe to reports of interest and have them sent automatically. They should also be able to search or browse a report catalogue and view reports that have been run or request reruns of older reports to get current data. Reports should be available via a Web browser or mobile apps and be readable on different screen sizes. Reporting systems include support for multilevel security to protect sensitive corporate data. Enterprise-wide security profiles, policies and procedures should be supported by the reporting software security system.

The Reporting Reference Content in LEADing Practice’s Enterprise Information & Technology Standards align all the best and next practices as well as the standards for Reporting.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50011PGIDBC

Description:

An application is a piece of software designed to carry out a particular task. Each application adds a capability to the enterprise to engage in useful, computer-supported work. An Application consists of application components with modules that make up each application component. Each application has features, which are notable properties or characteristics of the application. The feature can include a trait or a design constraint. The application has functions that are a specification of a significant aspect of the internal behaviour of the application, which acts as a broader description of a set of application features. An application task is the automated behaviour of activity in a process performed by the application. Application Services are an externally visible unit of functionality, provided by one or more components, exposed through well-defined interfaces, and meaningful to the application environment.

Applications arise from information objects that convey information about real-world objects that can be in any medium or form, specialised by the application. Application (or System) flows specify the sequence in which application tasks are executed, one of which provides an output that is an input to another. The Application Reference Content in LEADing Practice’s Enterprise Information & Technology Standards align all the best and next practices as well as the standards for Application.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50012SAIDBCBP

Description:

Application Modernization and Optimization (AMO) helps reduce IT costs and enhances productivity by eliminating, consolidating or replacing existing applications with more cost-effective solutions. As tools age, organisation layer new functionality on top of an archaic interface, thus undermining the organisation’s long-term health.

AMO rethinks its existing application landscape to ensure performance only gets better over time rather than degrade. AMO brings better security, where consumers and employees trust organizations with their sensitive data with safeguarded information with modern protection measures. AMO identifies and designs tools that offer faster speed and uninterrupted work by operating smoothly. Steady connection and quick load speed save time, effort and frustration.

AMO eliminates duplication by unifying disparate systems into one aligned site, so organizations don’t waste time searching for the right location with its consequences. The AMO Reference Content in LEADing Practice’s Enterprise Information & Technology Standards align all the best and next practices as well as the standards for AMO.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50013SAIDBCBP

Description:

Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) is essentially a suite of business integrated applications that an organisation can use to collect, store, manage, and interpret data from its many business activities. ERP provides an integrated and continuously updated view of core business processes, services and information flows using common databases maintained by a database management system.

ERP systems track business resources such as cash, raw materials, production capacity, and the status of business commitments such as orders, payroll, taxes. The applications that make up an ERP system share data across various departments (manufacturing, purchasing, sales, accounting, and others) that provide the data. ERP facilitates information flow between all these and other business functional areas, customers, suppliers, creditors, and employees as well as managing connections with outside stakeholders that may include the general public, communities, activist groups, business support groups, and the media. ERP integrates various organisational systems with error-free transactions, thereby enhancing the organisation’s efficiency.

ERP systems should incorporate best practices, reflecting the software vendor’s interpretation of the most effective way to perform each business process and the ways that the customer can modify these practices. The ERP Reference Content in LEADing Practice’s Enterprise Information & Technology Standards align all the best and next practices as well as the standards for ERP.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50014SADIBC

Description:

Software testing is an investigation conducted to provide stakeholders with information about the quality of the software product or service under test. Software testing can also provide an objective, independent view of the software to allow the business to appreciate, and understand the risks of software implementation. Test techniques include the process of executing a program or application with the intent of finding software bugs (errors or other defects), and verifying that the software product is fit for use.

Software testing involves the execution of a software component or system component to evaluate one or more properties of interest. In general, these properties indicate the extent to which the component or system under test:

  • meets the requirements that guided its design and development,
  • responds correctly to all kinds of inputs,
  • performs its functions within an acceptable time,
  • is sufficiently usable,
  • can be installed and run in its intended environments, and
  • achieves the general result its stakeholders desire.

As the number of possible tests for even simple software components is practically infinite, all software testing uses some strategy to select tests that are feasible for the available time and resources.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50015SADI

Description:

Information management is a cycle of processes that support the organization’s learning activities: identifying information needs, acquiring information, organizing and storing information, developing information products and services, distributing information and using information. The purpose of information management is to: understand, design, develop, manage, and use information with insight, and innovation.

Support decision making, and create value for individuals, organizations, communities, and partners. We have a lot of different Information Management services that help you, in your journey:

  • Where and how you could learn from others (we have Information Management best, industry and outperforming practices).
  • Develop a Information Management Business Case.
  • Analyze and evaluate your Information Management Maturity.
  • Benchmark yourself against the leaders in the market (outperforming practices).
  • Assess your existing Information Management Strategy and help enhance it/develop it.
  • Identify Information Management requirements and assess your development potential.
  • Analyze your Information Management concept/portfolio.
  • Design a new – or improve upon an existing – Information Management Roadmap.
  • How to go about Information Management orchestration (advanced categorization and classification).
  • Rethink and transform your workflows (manual and automated) to enable it by Information Management.
  • Identify optimization potential with the Information Management concepts.
  • Information Architecture Opportunity Assessment.

Other services which might be interesting in combination with the above:

  • We have data across 10 sectors and 52 different industries, categorised according to which practices are worst, best, and outperforming practices. Therefore, we can benchmark you against these information management practices and come with detailed improvement suggestions of where and how you could learn from others, enabling you with best, industry and outperforming practices.
  • How to go about cost reduction using Information Management.
  • How to go about Information Management orchestration (advanced categorization and classification).
  • Develop a Information Management Architecture; something that can help structure and align various information and management concepts and landscape.
  • Information Change Management services.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50016BCIDSA

Description:

The explosion of data types, sources and use cases makes it difficult enough to get the clarity you need to make the right decisions with confidence. Evaluating the best data integration solution for your needs shouldn’t add to the chaos. In modern management usage, the term data is increasingly replaced by information or even knowledge in a non-technical context.

However, data management is an administrative process that includes acquiring, validating, storing, protecting, and processing required data, and information to ensure the accessibility, reliability, and timeliness for its users.

We have a lot of different Data Management services that help you, in your journey:

  • Where and how you could learn from others (we have Data Management best, industry and outperforming practices).
  • Develop a Data Management Business Case.
  • Analyze and evaluate your Data Management Maturity.
  • Benchmark yourself against the leaders in the market (outperforming practices).
  • Assess your existing Data Management Strategy and help enhance it/develop it.
  • Identify Data Management requirements and assess your development potential.
  • Analyze your Data Management concept/portfolio.
  • Design a new – or improve upon an existing – Data Management Roadmap.
  • How to go about Data Management orchestration (advanced categorization and classification).
  • Rethink and transform your workflows (manual and automated) to enable it by Data Management.
  • Identify optimization potential with the Data Management concepts.
  • Information Architecture Opportunity Assessment.
  • Develop a Data Management Architecture; something that can help structure and align various data and information concepts and landscape.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50017DISABC

Description:

Business rules direct what an organisation can do externally of internally. The business strategy provides the high-level direction, and the business rules provide detailed guidance about how the strategy translates to action. Rule Modelling captures a way of formally defining business rules, including their sequencing and the aspects of the business that they impact. The models orchestrate the automatic generation of application (programming) code that would implement the rules. Business rules can relate to policies (from which they derive), requirements (which they realise) and the software application services that implement them.

Rules models draw on rules methodology that defines a process of capturing business rules in natural language that is unambiguous hence verifiable. This easy to understand approach empowers business stakeholders to manage their own business rules in real-time, thus keep abreast of continually changing business circumstances. The Rule Modelling Reference Content in LEADing Practice’s Enterprise Information & Technology Standards align all the best and next practices as well as the standards for Rule Modelling.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50018PGBCSADI

Description:

Service-oriented computing is a paradigm for distributed computing that builds application networks using services as fundamental elements for developing applications. A service arises from a provider that provides the service and a consumer of that service. Without this duality, there cannot be a concept of a service. The primary goal of service-oriented computing, therefore, is a collection of provided software services accessible via standardised protocols whose functionality applications can automatically discover, integrate and consume.

The Service-Oriented Computing Reference Content in LEADing Practice’s Enterprise Information & Technology Standards align all the best and next practices as well as the standards for Service-Oriented Computing.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50019ES

Description:

Platform describes the technology platform on which applications run, and data is stored. A platform device is a set of platform components configured to act as a modular part of a platform. A platform function specifies a significant job or task of the internal behaviour of the platform. A platform Service is a technical delivery task required to provide platform enablement mechanisms to support the delivery of one or more parts of an application. A platform rule arises from the criteria used in the process of determining the behaviour of the platform. Platform compliance (including security) is the means of adhering to and verifying adherence to policies and decisions about the platform. Platform media is the matter or material provided by a platform as the source or method for storing data. A platform channel is a physical path used by a platform to host application software.

The Platform Reference Content in LEADing Practice’s Enterprise Information & Technology Standards align all the best and next practices as well as the standards for Platform.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50020PLES

Description:

Infrastructure describes the technology infrastructure underpinning the technology platform. An infrastructure component is an abstract description of the features of the existing environment that the platform requires to operate. An infrastructure device is a set of infrastructure components configured to act as a modular part of the infrastructure. An infrastructure function is the specification of a significant aspect of the internal behaviour of the infrastructure which acts as a broader description of a set of infrastructure features.

An infrastructure feature is a notable property or characteristic of the infrastructure that can include a trait or a design constraint. An infrastructure service is a technical delivery task required to provide infrastructure enablement mechanisms to support the delivery of one or more parts of a platform. An infrastructure rule arises from the criteria used in the process of determining the behaviour of the infrastructure. Infrastructure compliance (including security) is the means of adhering to and verifying adherence to policies and decisions about the infrastructure. Infrastructure Media is the matter or material provided by an infrastructure as the source or method for transmitting data. An infrastructure channel is a physical communication path used by an infrastructure component to provide the resources needed by a platform.

The Infrastructure Reference Content in LEADing Practice’s Enterprise Information & Technology Standards align all the best and next practices as well as the standards for Infrastructure.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50021IL

Description:

Social media are interactive computer-mediated technologies that facilitate human interactions via virtual communities and networks. Social media are interactive Web 2.0 Internet-based applications. It captures user-generated content such as text posts or comments, digital photos or videos, and data generated through all online interactions.

Users create service-specific profiles for the website or app that are designed and maintained by social media organisations such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Snapchat, to name a few. As users engage with these electronic services, they create highly interactive platforms through which individuals, communities, and organisations can share, co-create, discuss, participate and modify user-generated content or self-curated content posted online.

Wikis and Google Docs are further examples that depict social media interaction through collaborative content creation. Social media furthermore document memories, learn about and explore things, advertise oneself and form friendships as well as the growth of ideas from the creation of blogs, podcasts, videos, and gaming sites. This changing relationship between human and technology is the focus of socio-technical systems. Social media may be contextualised by Stamper’s “semiotic ladder”, which has the social world as its pinnacle with human (or business) creativity leveraged by the productivity of computers.

The Social Media Reference Content in LEADing Practice’s Enterprise Information & Technology Standards align all the best and next practices as well as the standards for Social Media.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50022ALL

Description:

Distributed cloud refers to the distribution of public cloud services to locations outside the cloud provider’s physical data centers, but which are still controlled by the provider. In distributed cloud, the cloud provider is responsible for all aspects of cloud service architecture, delivery, operations, governance, and updates. The evolution from centralized public cloud to distributed public cloud ushers in a new era of cloud computing.

Distributed cloud allows data centers to be located anywhere. This solves both technical issues like latency, and also regulatory challenges like data sovereignty. It also offers the benefits of a public cloud service alongside the benefits of a private, local cloud.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50023ALL

Description:

Automation uses technology to automate tasks that once required humans. Hyperautomation deals with the application of advanced technologies, including artificial intelligence (AI), and machine learning (ML), to increasingly automate processes, and augment humans. Hyperautomation extends across a range of tools that can be automated, but also refers to the sophistication of the automation (i.e., discover, analyze, design, automate, measure, monitor, reassess.).

As no single tool can replace humans, hyperautomation today involves a combination of tools, including robotic process automation (RPA), intelligent business management software (iBPMS), and AI, with a goal of increasingly AI-driven decision making.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50024ALL

Description:

Machine learning is an application of artificial intelligence (AI) that provides systems the ability to automatically learn, and improve From experience, without being explicitly programmed. Machine learning focuses on the development of computer programs that can access data, and use it learn for themselves. Currently, machine learning has been used in multiple fields, and industries. For example, medical diagnosis, image processing, prediction, classification, learning association, regression etc.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50025ALL

Description:

Robotic automation (RA) extends robotic process automation (RPA) beyond process flows to include information and service flows that contextualise rather than as a sub-component of business processes. Thus, the business value is not sub-optimised or impaired by automating processes alone. Like RPA, RA applies artificial intelligence to business processes, but to information and service flows too. Along with RPA, the RA Standardisation – Best Practice Flows Reference Content in LEADing Practice’s Enterprise Information & Technology Standards align all the best and next practices as well as the standards for RA.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50026ALL

Description:

Smart Automation combines a deep understanding of workflow with the right data to allow highly efficient, accurate, and controlled decision-making. For example, cruise control that maintains a car’s speed is one example of automation—smart automation using this example is extending the automation to a fully self-driving car. There are numerous smart automation examples:

  • Smart buildings are connected, internet-enabled with connected lighting, thermostats, HVAC, presence sensor, lockers, actuators, meters and even smart plugs.
  • Smart energy concepts with connected to the internet-enabled electric grid, voltage and power sensors, meters and breakers as well as fault detection.
  • Smart manufacturing has advanced automation, digital infrastructure, data-driven operations, flexible operation, decentralised control, and collaborative networks.
  • Smart cities have connected communities, better monitoring, security, improved traffic control, lighting and water management.
  • Smart healthcare includes up-to-date connected biosensors, probes and monitoring systems.
  • Smart industry has interrelated production control, interconnected and smart robotics as well as coupled security, actuators, and smart lighting to drive change.

The Smart Automation Reference Content in LEADing Practice’s Enterprise Information & Technology Standards align all the best and next practices as well as the standards for Smart Automation.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50027ALL

Description:

Industry 4.0 Technology describes the significant transformations and innovations in how organisations manufacture products or offer services due to the digitisation of their production. Industry 4.0 is the fourth revolution from the first industrial revolution (mechanisation through water and steam power) to the mass production and assembly lines using electricity in the second. The fourth industrial revolution will take what was started in the third with the adoption of computers and automation and enhance it with smart and autonomous systems fueled by data and artificial intelligence. Industry 4.0 streamlines enterprise operations, reduce costs, drives performance, and maximises value.

The Industry 4.0 Technology Reference Content in LEADing Practice’s Enterprise Information & Technology Standards align all the best and next practices as well as the standards for Industry 4.0 Technology.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50028ALL

Description:

Blockchain is a type of distributed ledger, an expanding, chronologically ordered list of cryptographically signed, irrevocable transactional records shared by all participants in a network. Blockchain also allows parties to trace assets back to their origin, which is beneficial for traditional assets, but also paves the way for other uses such as tracing food-borne illnesses back to the original supplier.

It also allows two or more parties who don’t know each other to safely interact in a digital environment, and exchange value without the need for a centralized authority. The complete blockchain model includes five elements: A shared, and distributed ledger, immutable and traceable ledger, encryption, tokenization, and a distributed public consensus mechanism. However, blockchain remains immature for enterprise deployments due to a range of technical issues including poor scalability and interoperability.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50029ALL

Description:

A workplace is a location where someone works for his or her employer, a place of employment. Such a place can range from a home office to a large office building or factory. The development of new digital technologies have led to the development of the digital workplace, a workplace that is not located in any one physical space.

With the increasing complexity of IT ecosystems, traditional processes with a focus on central management have challenges to fulfill the needs that modern digital workplaces dem, ands. Moreover, with the current siloed-thinking, and process-driven IT mindset, impact, and risks assessment (, and the overall operation) result in a lengthy decision process, and produce only little change to digital workplace innovation.

Concepts from Workplace Design Thinking to Workplace Productization has been approaches to break down existing, and siloed IT environments into concrete, and deliverable items, and to re-organise them inside of elements. A set of items gets bundled to a product, each product represents a standardised ready-to-use / ready-to-consume unit which is delivered, and charged as a service. to support the digital innovation to achieve an optimal Workplace transformation, we deliver the following services:

  • Analysis of the current Workplace situation and come up with detailed improvement suggestions.
  • Analyze and evaluate your Workplace Maturity.
  • Assess your existing Workplace Strategy and help enhance it.
  • Develop directional Workplace aspects (vision, strategy, objectives, etc.).
  • Identify Workplace requirements and assess your development potential.
  • Design a new – or improve upon an existing – Workplace Roadmap.
  • Assess and develop your Workplace Portfolio concept.
  • Analyze your Workplace user (role) concept.
  • Rethink and transform your workflows (manual and automated).
  • Recognize and agree on where and how to standardize.
  • Determine how you can break free from your Workplace siloes.
  • Spot and detail how to decomplexify your Workplace solutions.
  • Identify optimization potential within the Workplace concepts.
  • Assign and work with your Workplace owners.
  • Develop a continuous Workplace improvement technique.
  • Develop a Workplace Architecture; something that can help structure and align various Workplace concepts and the Workplace landscape.
  • We can help the transformation from “siloed IT-centric Workplace services” to “user-centric Workplace products”.
  • Work with change and make it stick!

Other services which might be interesting in combination with the above:

  • We have data across 10 sectors and 52 different industries, categorised according to which practices are worst, best, and outperforming practices. Therefore, we can benchmark you against these practices and come with detailed improvement suggestions of where and how you could learn from others, enabling you with best, industry and outperforming practices.
  • Knowledge worker analysis; identification of your knowledge workers (depending on industry, about 5-15% are core differentiating and core competitive knowledge workers). The rest are non-core knowledge workers, and therefore differentiating the Workplace concepts adds no value.
  • How to go about Workplace cost reduction.
  • How to go about Workplace Innovation & Transformation (incl. advanced categorization and classification). This could be used to develop clean and simple:
    • Workplace as a Product (WaaP) concepts – can be used for Workplace product basket structure.
    • Workplace Product as a Service (WPaaS) concepts – simplifies overall construct and enhances service value delivered.
    • Develop a Workplace Business Case.
    • Workplace Change Management services.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50030ALL

Description:

Digital twin of the organization (DTO), allowing organizations to visualize how organizational areas, groups, functions, processes, services, and key performance indicators interact to drive value. The DTO then becomes an integral part of the hyperautomation process, providing real-time, continuous intelligence about the organization and driving significant business opportunities.

Standard Number: #LEAD-ES50031ALL

All LEADing Practice Enterprise Standards are also marked and protected with the official ((O))LEAD Trademark registered in the US and EU. See the following image of the ((O))LEAD Trademark.

LEADing Practice - LEAD Trademark

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